Rantin' and Rovin'

Indonesia

Archaeology 101: What We Find

Archaeology 101: What We Find

Dirt. Archaeologists primarily find dirt, dirt, and more dirt. Many people engaging in archaeology for the first time are surprised at how much dirt we move over the course of an excavation, and rightfully so. But archaeologists do find quite a few other things, and they talk a lot about what they’ve found. So what is it that we look for in archaeology, and how do we categorize our finds?

Globetrotting

Globetrotting

Globetrotting: An Archaeologist’s Photo Journal is a collection of 50 of my favorite shots that I have taken over the past ten years. Many of them come from work I have done as an archaeologist or anthropologist, and some are just plain cool. Check it out on amazon and let me know what you think!

Globetrotting: A Photo Book

Globetrotting: A Photo Book

Globetrotting: An Archaeologist’s Photo Journal is a collection of 50 of my favorite shots that I have taken over the past ten years. Many of them come from work I have done as an archaeologist or anthropologist, and some are just plain cool. Check it out on amazon and let me know what you think!

Candi Prambanan: Why You Need to Go and How to Get There

Candi Prambanan: Why You Need to Go and How to Get There

Candi Prambanan is an ancient Shivaite temple located in Central Java, just 17km outside of the city of Yogyakarta. According to archaeologists, construction began in the end of the 9th century under Rakai Pikatan, ruler of the Matarm Kingdom.

Indonesia 2008 Photo Gallery

Indonesia 2008 Photo Gallery

These are many (though admittedly not all) of the photos I took while studying for a semester at Universitas Gadjah Mada with ACICIS in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.  Many of the photos are form Yogya, but many are also from Borobudur, Prambanan,…

15 June 2010

I’ve been awarded a St. Lawrence University Summer Research Fellowship this summer to look at glass beads in Southeast Asia, and that has started now in full force.

18 November 2009

Going back to this idea of inland versus coastal settlements, is it possible that Indianization could have only been occurring on the coasts, not really penetrating the interior, if Indianization occurred at all? Also, what if Indianization occurred with luxury trade rather than more utilitarian trade? So Indian objects may be present at sites in Southeast Asia, but only in elite contexts?

14 November 2009

Indonesia seems to have an interesting dichotomy (or at least division) between coastal and inland settlements. Both types of settlements seem to have similar levels of power, but they exercise them in different ways (according to some scholars).

2 November 2009

There’s a big issue of data in Indonesia. Not necessarily a lack of objects, but a lack of available information about those objects. Given this lack of data (well, lack of accessible, published data outside of Indonesia), how are people making sweeping conclusions about these polities if there’s not enough data to conclude anything?

12 September 2009

I’ve been reading about Indianization (the idea that most cultural innovation in Indonesia (and Southeast Asia) in the first millennium AD came from India, either through colonists or migrants), which I find problematic on a number of levels.

%d bloggers like this: