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Winter Hiking to Mystic Seaport Museum

Winter Hiking to Mystic Seaport Museum

I’ll be honest, when I first took up hiking (all of a week ago), I didn’t think my first experience hiking in snow would be my commute to work. But in case you hadn’t heard, the Northeast region of the United States got absolutely smashed by the blizzard, Juno. Yesterday, as I was grumbling about the lack of cleared hiking trails, I remembered that where I work is only about two miles from my house. So I got my hiking gear on, packed normal clothes and all my work supplies in my day pack, and set out on foot.

Exploring the Mysteries of Mystic Seaport After Hours

Exploring the Mysteries of Mystic Seaport After Hours

There’s a quiet that falls around 5pm at the Seaport. The gate has closed, the main restaurants are generally closed, and the interpreters are beginning to leave their exhibits. The offices are starting to empty and the light is starting to fade.

Whaling and the Industrial Revolution Part 1: Why Whales?

Whaling and the Industrial Revolution Part 1: Why Whales?

Whaling was one of the largest industries in New England during the 20th century, and it fueled the Industrial Revolution. At Mystic Seaport, we often say that the economy of the Industrial Revolution was built on the backs of whales.…

The Joseph Conrad

The Joseph Conrad

The Joseph Conrad was built in 1881-2 by Burmeister and Wain in Copenhagen. The ship was owned by Frederik Stage, who originally named the ship after his son, Georg. Georg died in 1880 from tuberculosis, and the ship was a memorial to him.

Frederik began his career as a deckboy and worked his way up to become a prominent shipowner. He found his start as a deckboy difficult and often demeaning, and wanted to make others’ training easier. The Conrad (known as the Georg Stage at the time) trained boys not only as crew, but also as mates.

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