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Why Should You Care about Archaeology?

Why Should You Care about Archaeology?

We tend to look at the past and think, “People back then didn’t know that much. We’re so much smarter now.” We look at the past with a sort of superiority complex, acting like we’re somehow more capable, smarter, and…

How to Find Truth in Ancient Art

How to Find Truth in Ancient Art

A few days ago, my friend wrote a post about art in archaeology and whether it is artistic expression or an accurate representation of how things were at that time. This is a question that has plagued archaeologists and art…

Our Town and Archaeology: Part 2

Our Town and Archaeology: Part 2

Our production of Our Town opens this Friday, and in case you haven’t heard, an actual time capsule from 1901 was discovered in the head of the lion statue at the Old State House in Boston. 1901 is when the first act of Our Town takes place, which is the exact year the Stage Manager talks about that time capsule in the cornerstone of the bank.

Archaeology Isn’t About Stuff

Archaeology Isn’t About Stuff

There are a lot of popular conceptions about archaeology and archaeologists. Some of these are more truthful than others, but most of them all emphasize archaeologists’ obsession with objects. But archaeology isn’t really about stuff, it’s about people.

Travel to See vs. Travel to Experience

Travel to See vs. Travel to Experience

Last week, National Geographic published a post about problems with the ‘1000 Places to See Before You Die’ method of travel. The kind of travel that treats ‘top’ destinations like pokemon – gotta collect ‘em all.

I liked this article quite a lot, largely because I used to be one of those people (and probably still am, despite my best efforts). I used to act as though the extent to which a person traveled and the exotic nature of the destination were related to a person’s status in society. As if travel were some sort of competition. And that’s a poor way to look at travel.

Finding Motivation in Humanity

Finding Motivation in Humanity

Last week I wrote a post about doing much of my research at Starbucks, but I didn’t really go into why I like to do my work there. That was partly because that post was long enough as it was, but it was also because I hadn’t really thought about it. I like sitting in Starbucks is because a six year old little girl will come in with a pink scooter complete with pink umbrella…

Archivists and Librarians are Wizards

Archivists and librarians are wizards.

I don’t care what your profession is, archivists and librarians are wizards, and you should never ever forget it.

Benjamin Lee Whorf (1897 – 1941)

Benjamin Lee Whorf (1897 – 1941)

Benjamin Lee Whorf was a student of Edward Sapir, who had trained under Franz Boas. Whorf spent several years as a fire prevention engineer and inspector. During that time, he noticed that language sometimes caused otherwise intelligent people to behave in a way that started fires…

Inchmahome and Callander

Inchmahome and Callander

The past few days have been very busy indeed, and I will write a post about them soon. In the meantime, we spent most of today walking around various sites in and around Inchamhome Priory and the nearby town of Callander.

Edward Sapir (1884 – 1939)

Edward Sapir (1884 – 1939)

Edward Sapir (1884 – 1939) was one of Boas’s first students to study linguistics and later worked with Alfred Kroeber (another of Boas’s students) to document Native American languages in California. He believed that ethnology was the science of mental phenomena, and was therefore closely connected to psychology. Sapir focused on the individual, and his main interest was in the connection between language and thought, not language and behavior.

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