Rantin' and Rovin'

travel

Exploring the Mysteries of Mystic Seaport After Hours

Exploring the Mysteries of Mystic Seaport After Hours

There’s a quiet that falls around 5pm at the Seaport. The gate has closed, the main restaurants are generally closed, and the interpreters are beginning to leave their exhibits. The offices are starting to empty and the light is starting to fade.

Mallaig, Skye, and the Jacobite Steam Engine

Mallaig, Skye, and the Jacobite Steam Engine

After a very wet and rainy day and a night of being somewhat colder than I had hoped and listening to sober people shouting at drunk people and then drunk people shouting back, I woke up to a beautiful sunny day with an amazing view of Ben Nevis. I had some pretty big plans, so I ate a quick breakfast and packed by backpack, leaving my tent and sleeping bag back at the campsite.

Western Highlands Trip Part 1: Oban and Mull!

Western Highlands Trip Part 1: Oban and Mull!

A few weeks ago, I took a very impromptu camping trip out to the Western Highlands and Islands, which I have now dubbed my absolute favorite place to travel in the world. I’ve been a lot of places, but this easily beats them all. I’m not sure if it’s the mountain-island combo that did me in or the wonderful people or the amazing food. It was probably all three.

Travel to See vs. Travel to Experience

Travel to See vs. Travel to Experience

Last week, National Geographic published a post about problems with the ‘1000 Places to See Before You Die’ method of travel. The kind of travel that treats ‘top’ destinations like pokemon – gotta collect ‘em all.

I liked this article quite a lot, largely because I used to be one of those people (and probably still am, despite my best efforts). I used to act as though the extent to which a person traveled and the exotic nature of the destination were related to a person’s status in society. As if travel were some sort of competition. And that’s a poor way to look at travel.

Finding Motivation in Humanity

Finding Motivation in Humanity

Last week I wrote a post about doing much of my research at Starbucks, but I didn’t really go into why I like to do my work there. That was partly because that post was long enough as it was, but it was also because I hadn’t really thought about it. I like sitting in Starbucks is because a six year old little girl will come in with a pink scooter complete with pink umbrella…

Dunnottar Castle

Dunnottar Castle

If ever there were a castle to visit, it would be Dunnottar Castle, located about 2 miles south of the town of Stonehaven on the east coast of Scotland. Seriously, guys, this is the castle of all castles.

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle

If you ever happen to find yourself in Edinburgh and you haven’t seen the castle, you seriously should. Castle Rock has been occupied since roughly 900 BC, judging by archaeological evidence. It is also mentioned in the Y Gododdin, an Welsh epic written sometime between the 7th and 11th centuries AD concerning battles in the area and the exploits of the Gododdin (the exact date of the original is contested).

In the Footsteps of the Vikings

In the Footsteps of the Vikings

Arrochar and Tarbet are two small villages in Argyll, Scotland. Tarbet is located on the edge of Loch Lomond, while Arrochar is on the banks of Loch Long. I have traveled many, many places, and I must say this is by far the prettiest place I have ever been.

Yorkshire Museum and York Minster

Yorkshire Museum and York Minster

We had several hours between getting to York and being able to check into the conference. So, naturally, we did what any group of eight archaeologists does when in York for a conference: check out the museum and explore the Minster.

Christmas in Inverness

Christmas in Inverness

“Really? Why would you want to go there?” Joss asked. And Tom. And Steve. And pretty much every Scot once they heard I and a few North American friends were going to Inverness for Christmas.

%d bloggers like this: