Rantin' and Rovin'

USA

Winter Hiking Roger Williams Park

Winter Hiking Roger Williams Park

I’m a native Rhode Islander, and like every native Rhode Islander, I have fond memories of Roger Williams Park (there’s a zoo, a carousel, and all kinds of fun playground stuff). There’s also a huge amount of park in Roger Williams Park, and most people drive around it for several minutes before reaching their destination. I’d never really walked around the park before, so about ten days ago (before all this snow) I decided to go for a hike out there.

Winter Hiking to Mystic Seaport Museum

Winter Hiking to Mystic Seaport Museum

I’ll be honest, when I first took up hiking (all of a week ago), I didn’t think my first experience hiking in snow would be my commute to work. But in case you hadn’t heard, the Northeast region of the United States got absolutely smashed by the blizzard, Juno. Yesterday, as I was grumbling about the lack of cleared hiking trails, I remembered that where I work is only about two miles from my house. So I got my hiking gear on, packed normal clothes and all my work supplies in my day pack, and set out on foot.

Theory Trends in Archaeology

Theory Trends in Archaeology

People like Bourdieu, Geertz, de Saussure, Levi Strauss, Boas, Whorf, Sapir, Kroeber, Mead, Benedict, Schiffer, Binford, Marx, Engels, and many, many others are seen as outdated. They were writing their theories roughly fifty of more years ago, and they’ve been largely disproven by later work. And many academics feel that we should therefore not use any of their theories, because they’re outdated.

Here’s the thing: None of the theories put forth by these academics were ever really disproven in their entirety. Not really. No matter who you look at, there’s something in their work that makes sense, at least for certain specific situations or types of data.

Starbucks and the Archaeology of an Archaeologist

Starbucks and the Archaeology of an Archaeologist

About two weeks ago, Robert Chapple made a somewhat unusual archaeology post. He contacted a number of colleagues from around the world and asked them to send him a photo of their desk, right then and there, no tidying allowed. Here’s the problem: I don’t actually have my own desk.

This Week in Archaeology: 4 – 10 May 2014

Last week, we learned more about Stonehenge and its origins through extensive radiocarbon dating! Archaeologists also discovered not one, but two medieval villages (one in the Scottish Borders and another in Wales), a 13,500 year-old tool-making site in Idaho, a 19th century prison block in Australia, a New Kingdom tomb at Saqqara and a 5,600-year-old tomb (pre-dynastic) in Egypt, the burials of those who built the Qin Dynasty tomb famous for the terracotta warriors in China, an early Roman basilica in Turkey, and an 18th century tavern in New York City. We also found out more about the Black Death, the coastal heritage of Qatar, the conditions of US Civil War prison camps, and the meaning of geoglyphs in Peru’s Chincha Valley. We also found a preserved 9th century wooden notebook on a Byzantine ship!

The Final Countdown

The Final Countdown

It’s down to the final three days. Part of me feels like that is far too little time to finish everything I have to do. I need another week, at least. The other part of me feels that it is far too long to expect me to wait. I want to hop a plane now and get to Glasgow. Oh, and there’s a third part of me that’s is sort of in denial. I’m not moving across the pond in three days; you must be mistaken.

Globetrotting

Globetrotting

Globetrotting: An Archaeologist’s Photo Journal is a collection of 50 of my favorite shots that I have taken over the past ten years. Many of them come from work I have done as an archaeologist or anthropologist, and some are just plain cool. Check it out on amazon and let me know what you think!

Chomsky, Democracy, and Education in America

There’s an article floating around Facebook today in which a professor of American History, Dan Falcone, interviews Noam Chomsky about his views on the current education system in America. I’m not going to go into the major details, simply because that would be an enormous post and I don’t think any of you really want to read all that. However, one of Chomsky’s main themes in this interview is the idea that our education system does not educate us to be good thinkers, it educates us to be obedient workers.

For anyone who’s studied anthropology or sociology before, that should be sending up a huge flag with the name Foucault written all over it.

Globetrotting: A Photo Book

Globetrotting: A Photo Book

Globetrotting: An Archaeologist’s Photo Journal is a collection of 50 of my favorite shots that I have taken over the past ten years. Many of them come from work I have done as an archaeologist or anthropologist, and some are just plain cool. Check it out on amazon and let me know what you think!

Perfection

Perfection

I woke up the morning before going to staff training for Legacy International’s Global Youth Village and decided that I wanted to wander outside for a while.  I’ve been trying to work on my photography skills, so I took my…

%d bloggers like this: